Common-Interest Housing - Condos and Townhomes

by Tricia Cyr 01/26/2020

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

Common-interest housing includes individually owned spaces and common areas shared by all owners. The common areas can include clubhouses, landscaping, parking lots or pools. Multistory buildings share lobbies, stairwells, and elevators. Any community that shares property including single-family free-standing homes in developments, falls into the common-interest category. 

The two most familiar types of common-interest housing terms are condominiums (or condos) and townhomes (or townhouses). Although both belong in the category of common-interest housing, condos and townhouses may mean different things depending on regional or legal definitions.

The Difference

A condo is a shared building or group of buildings and common spaces in which housing units are owned individually. This could be a single unit within a tower building or a conjoined home having its own ground floor with exterior entry. Other homes in the condominium category include single-family cottages or even modular homes inside planned communities. When you purchase a condo, you own the unit itself while you are a co-owner of the common areas.

A townhome is a style of house that is connected to another structure on at least one side. It may be solely owned by an individual as part of a CID, part of a multi-family apartment dwelling, or individually owned without property in common. A true townhome is built with independent sidewalls that stand alone even if they touch the walls of another townhome. When you purchase a townhouse, you own the unit itself and whatever yard area is affiliated with it as you would with a detached single-family house.

While condominium units might incorporate elements like private outdoor spaces, individual ground-floor entry options or design elements that resemble those of a townhome, it is ownership that truly defines them. 

Homeowners’ Association 

All CID properties have a homeowners’ association (HOA) of some sort. While some are mainly hands-off with regard to individual units, others have specific regulations regarding renting, remodeling, and exterior décor. 

If you are trying to decide between purchasing a condominium or a townhouse, have your agent explain the differences in common ownership between them, and make certain to factor in the HOA fees to your monthly budget.

About the Author
Author

Tricia Cyr

Tricia Cyr is the owner /broker of CYR Real Estate, a Connecticut real estate company that has been in business for 27 years. After working for a small real estate firm located in Branford, she decided to start her own real estate company. Not only has she been actively selling real estate on the Connecticut shoreline for over 27 years, but she is also a lifetime resident of the shoreline. "I am a full-time real estate broker who knows what it takes to get the job done, allowing you to have complete confidence that you will be well represented. I give personal attention, always keeping myself accessible. I return my phone calls promptly.”

Tricia is energetic, efficient, honest, dependable and always working with your best interest in mind. Offering the highest quality of service and will make your real estate experience a pleasant one. Cyr Real Estate has been generating repeat clients and personal referrals for 27 years. We use all the latest technology & tools to successfully market all our properties. If you are interested in buying or selling a home, or if you need help with property management, please consider Cyr Real Estate 203-481-6638 New Haven Middlesex Association of Realtors | Connecticut Association of Realtors National Association of Realtors | Shoreline Chamber of Commerce.